The Brink: Andrew Dadson — A Final Weekend and a New Book

It’s the last weekend to see The Brink: Andrew Dadson, the exhibition presented on the occasion of the biennial award given to an artist in British Columbia, Washington, or Oregon in the early stages of a promising career. This year’s recipient of The Brink is Andrew Dadson, whose canvasses, photographs, and works on paper have been on view in the Henry’s East Gallery since April. As we bid the show farewell we are happy to announce the launch of a publication to commemorate the artist and his first solo museum exhibition.

For this book we collaborated again with Portland-based Publication Studio, the independent publisher who was an artist-in-residence during last summer’s book-oriented program, Shelf Life. Publication Studio has helped countless artists, writers, and cultural organizations make and publish books, including two that the Henry and Publication Studio co-published last summer with the artists Lucy Pullen and Matthew Offenbacher.

 

 

Readers are taken on a photographic walk through the exhibition space, interspersed with detail images of key pieces. The installation was beautifully shot by Jones Sanchez, who captured both the immense size of the artworks as well as the bright colors peeking out between heavy black brushstrokes. The book also includes short essays by exhibition curator Sara Krajewski and Hedreen Gallery curator Jessica Powers, and an interview conducted by Reid Shier, the director of Presentation House Gallery in North Vancouver. These were typographically set in a bold, black font to suggest the monochromes so often present in Andrew’s work.

 

 

We were privileged to be able to work closely with Andrew on the design of this book, and because of this we were able to produce something truly special. Because not only was he gracious enough to dig up images and contribute his thoughts throughout the design process, Andrew decided to make the covers for the first edition of his book by hand.

That’s right. All 100 covers of the first edition have been handmade by Andrew Dadson, who crafted them in a manner similar to Painted Paper Folds Up, Down, Left, Right (2012), an artwork currently on view. Andrew spent a few days straight working on the covers before mailing them from his studio in Vancouver to Publication Studio in Portland, where the covers were bound to the rest of the book. The covers are incredibly tactile, the heavy coat of paint cracking at the edges formed by the folds in the paper. It takes the book from being a simple publication and into the realm of the artist multiple.

The Brink: Andrew Dadson comes down this Sunday, July 22 and the book will be available for purchase this weekend. We hope you’ll take one last look at the show and then stop by the front desk to check out the book and hold Andrew’s work in your own hands.

 

 

The Brink: Andrew Dadson
Limited edition of 100

64 pp.

Published June 2012 on the occasion of the exhibition The Brink: Andrew Dadson at the Henry Art Gallery, University of Washington, Seattle, on view April 21 to July 22, 2012 and organized by Henry Curator Sara Krajewski.

Texts by Sara Krajewski, Jessica Powers, and Reid Shier with Andrew Dadson
Design by Jayme Yen

Printed and bound by Publication Studio, Portland, Oregon
www.publicationstudio.biz

 

The Brink is made possible by the generous support of Henry patrons John and Shari Behnke, founders of The Brink award. The exhibition is organized for the Henry by Curator Sara Krajewski.

The Latest HankBanner: Alyssa Volpigno

 

Thanks to artist Alyssa Volpigno for designing our beautiful new Hankblog banner! Alyssa has a BA in Interdisciplinary Visual Arts from the University of Washington. She works primarily in collage, and is the owner and chocolatier of Saltimbanque Chocolates. Alyssa is also the co-founder of an online curatorial project called Violet Strays with UW Photo alum Serrah Russell.

www.saltimbanquechocolates.com
www.violetstrays.com

If you’d like to contribute a banner to Hankblog, email info@henryart.org a 740 x 192 pixel image and include your name and a brief bio. We’ll select the best to feature in the next banner rotation!

A new Hankblog banner by Joe Milutis

Hankblog Header by Joe Milutis

Thank you to Joe Milutis who sent us this digitally-inspired new banner for Hankblog. Can you find the elusive Henry H? Joe is a writer, media artist, and Assistant Professor of Interdisciplinary Arts at the University of Washington-Bothell. www.joemilutis.com

Want to see your own artwork adorn the Henry’s blog? Email a 740 x 192 pixel jpeg or gif  to info@henryart.org and include your name and a brief bio. We’ll select the best to feature as a Hankblog banner!

TONIGHT: Shelf Life offsite public lecture by designer Layla Tweedie-Cullen

Shelf Life, the Henry’s look at books and independent publishing, closes this Sunday! But before then we’ve got a few more events to take us out on a high note. In partnership with the University of Washington School of Art – Design Division, we welcome New Zealand graphic designer Layla Tweedie-Cullen, who will give a public lecture at the UW Art Building (room 003) at 6:30 pm this evening. (Thursday, October 13th)

An accomplished graphic designer who trained in the Netherlands (her background includes a BA at the Rietveld Academie and an MA from the Werkplaats Typografie), she often works under the studio name Narrow Gauge designing books for artists and arts organizations. With an interest in critical and cross-disciplinary design and art practices, Layla established split/fountain, a project space, bookshop, publishing venture, and studio in Auckland.

Layla has just arrived in Seattle after representing S/F at the New York Art Book Fair, a premiere annual festival for independent publishers from around the world. There, bookshops both replenish their stocks as well as sell and trade their own book projects. Of the many publications Layla brought with her to the States, she has sold out of most of them. However, she’ll have samples of her books available for the audience to see in person tonight.

Layla’s involvement in publishing ranges from initiating independent publications to handling distribution and promotion, all the way to the meticulous typographic adjustments designers make to a file the night before it goes to the printer. Tonight, Layla will talk about what influenced her to found split/fountain and as well as her aspirations for the space and continuing publication projects. Please join us!

Note: Tonight’s lecture will be held at the UW School of Art building, room 003. Many thanks to Karen Cheng, Chair of Visual Communication Design at the UW School of Art, for helping us coordinate and supporting this event.

Shelf Life Public Talk @ the UW School of Art
Layla Tweedie-Cullen, Book Designer and Director of split/fountain (S/F)
Thursday, October 13
6:30 pm
Free and open to the public
University of Washington Art Building, room 003
Map

Shelf Life is the Henry’s summer ode to BOOKS and READING. From July 1 – October 16th, the Henry has invited book lovers from various fields — independent publishers, librarians, poets, writers, designers, and, most importantly, readers — to share with us what they do and why they love to do it. For a complete list of Shelf Life related programming, please visit this page.

Shelf Life welcomes Forms of Stand Up Comedy (Pt. 2)

We’re in the final stretch for Shelf Life. This exhibition and series of programs has been an exhilarating opportunity to work with people who work with books in myriad ways, opening and expanding the definitions of publishing and publications. The Shelf Life roster has included publishers, poets, writers, curators, and artists who have all outlined possible futures for books. And now to further open the conversation that has been going on since July, we welcome Stand Up Comedy to Shelf Life!

Stand Up Comedy is Diana Kim and Scott Ponik, with Morgan Ritter. Based in Portland, OR, and Stand Up Comedy is a shop for clothing, printed matter, and objects. Their contribution to Shelf Life is a compilation of short videos about and around the subjects of reading, publishing, and performance, titled Forms of Stand Up Comedy (Pt. 2). ‘Pt. 1′ of Forms of Stand Up Comedy was exhibited as part of Motto Storefront, a 2010 project at Artspeak in Vancouver. About their project SUC writes:

Forms of Stand Up Comedy (Pt. 2) is again a video reel. Represented are direct subjects (fashion, art, consumer culture, reading) by indirect associations. The material collected is easily available to the public, and in this grouping of segments tells a short story of the shop and its current practice. Pt. 2 visits the distribution, consumption, and veneration of independent publishing as it exists currently within a system of alternative economies. It suggests the discussion be framed through multiple creative mediums, and with an expansive series of references that may help un-define its future.

Forms of Stand Up Comedy (Pt. 2) will be on display for a short time only — just until Shelf Life closes on Sunday, October 16th! Stop by soon for short clips of videos featuring George Carlin, Paul Rand, and even Glenn Danzig. (Really!)

Forms of Stand Up Comedy (Pt. 2)
Ongoing display
October 4 – 16
Test Site

Shelf Life is the Henry’s summer ode to BOOKS and READING. From July 1 – October 16th, the Henry has invited book lovers from various fields — independent publishers, librarians, poets, writers, designers, and, most importantly, readers — to share with us what they do and why they love to do it. For a complete list of Shelf Life related programming, please visit this page.

Friday, September 30 at Shelf Life: Poste Restante c/o Eric Fredericksen

 

Since September 7th Shelf Life has welcomed the trickling-in of the exhibition Poste Restante, curated by Eric Fredericksen, director of Western Bridge. The objects of Poste Restante are large and small, oblong and round; a few are completely flat and one is shaped suspiciously like a sculpture. They lie in their original mailing packaging on two tables inside the Test Site. As Eric writes in the introduction to this show:

A set of artworks is addressed “Poste Restante” to the Henry Art Gallery and delivered via national postal systems. A relic of an archaic system, “poste restante” indicates an instruction to the post office to hold a letter or parcel until its intended recipient — a traveler, perhaps, or a clandestine contact, or a mistress — arrives to claim it. Works are presented as received, in envelopes or parcels. The work waits, held by the museum for a recipient whose identity and location are incompletely known. Information as the the contents is available largely through the forms attached to the parcel, documenting the contents for customs purposes, and the series of addresses and return addresses multiplying on the surface testify to the work’s maker and its itinerary.

The art object remains local, specific, visible only in certain spaces, while operating in far-flung networks of conversation and commerce. Like a letter sent instead of an email. In this project, delivery is deferred. A specific deferral is that of the resolution of ownership, the discovery of the work’s recipient. More generally deferred is the delivery of meaning, a suspension that is necessarily permanent: delivery of meaning is the end of art. So these letters must always arrive and never be delivered.

The participating artists of Poste Restante are Lucy Clout, Martin Creed, Jason Dodge, Allison Hrabluik, Hadley+Maxwell, Aaron Flint Jamison, Sam Lewitt, Heather and Ivan Morison, Avigail Moss, Pamela Rosenkranz, Dexter Sinister (with Christoph Keller), Matt Sheridan Smith, and Oscar Tuazon.

These letters and objects, handled by three national postal systems (to date) and many unknown hands (including those of Homeland Security) have their ties to Shelf Life as the subject matter for an upcoming publication that Eric is currently working on. So how does an exhibition about the immaterial … materialize into a book? Is the ‘unknown recipient’ actually the future reader? (Is a book never quite ‘finished’ until it is read?) Eric will deliver a public talk on this subject (and perhaps the intricacies of dealing with customs forms) inside Shelf Life at 7 pm Friday, September 30th.

Public Talk
Poste Restante c/o Eric Fredericksen
Friday, September 30
7pm
Test Site

Shelf Life is the Henry’s summer ode to BOOKS and READING. From July 1 – October 16th, the Henry has invited book lovers from various fields — independent publishers, librarians, poets, writers, designers, and, most importantly, readers — to share with us what they do and why they love to do it. For a complete list of Shelf Life related programming, please visit this page.

This Sunday at Shelf Life: Book Arts Performance Exhibition with Sandra Kroupa

Sandra Kroupa, legendary Book Arts and Rare Book Curator for UW Libraries’ Special Collections, joins us for the third installment of “Book Arts: Performance Exhibition” this Sunday, September 18, from 2-3 pm.

The third and final rotation of artists’ books, drawn from the Book Arts Collection at UW Special Collections, is now on display inside Shelf Life. Under the theme ‘Challenge’, books have been drawn from the Book Arts Collection at UW Libraries’ Special Collections that defy all definitions of the term ‘book’. From crayons, matches, to covers dotted with pins and needles, to paperback books in pickling spices — whew. I thought I’d seen it all when Sandra presented rotations #1 (‘Readings’) and #2 (‘Interpretations’) but the books of ‘Challenge’ are truly something else to behold.

This Sunday, September 18th, Sandra will bring additional works from the Book Arts Collection that serve to question and provoke our assumptions about the form of the book. The books that have been selected for display in Shelf Life do well as objects inside vitrines, but most of the works in the Book Arts collection need to be manipulated in some way — held, moved, ‘pages’ turned — in order to be understood. This series of Performance Exhibitions have allowed visitors another chance to see these inventive book structures up close as Sandra animates and ‘performs’ books for visitors.

Having spent decades in the field, Sandra is an encyclopedic fount of Book Art knowledge and lore. And as a generous and wonderful teacher, she is more than happy to share her wisdom and experience with visitors and students. Past Performance Exhibitions have elicited gasps of delight from audience members as well as furious note-taking (artists in the making, sketching plans for their own book projects?) and under the theme of ‘Challenge’ this Sunday’s event promises to offer even more opportunity for amazement and wonder. We hope to see you there!

This is the third but not the last of the Performance Exhibitions! The fourth and FINAL event is a DELUXE EDITION featuring not just Sandra Kroupa but the artist Jim Koss, who has work currently on display in Shelf Life (“Clearwater”, 1993). Sandra will bring a new set of artists’ books to discuss and perform and Jim will speak about his work and practice. This Performance Exhibition will take place Sunday, October 16th, and starts at 1 pm.

 

Shelf Life is the Henry’s summer ode to BOOKS and READING. From July 1 – October 16th, the Henry has invited book lovers from various fields — independent publishers, librarians, poets, writers, designers, and, most importantly, readers — to share with us what they do and why they love to do it. For a complete list of Shelf Life related programming, please visit this page.

This Sunday at Shelf Life: Gently Reading with Gentle Readers


At the last meeting of the Gentle Reader — Shelf Life‘s reading and discussion group — just talking about books got me so fired up that after we ended I promptly went up the street to Magus and picked up the first book that caught my eye (Steven Johnson’s Ghost Map, which I highly recommend). As I’ve mentioned before, I used to read books like drinking water, but that habit has waned severely over time. My reading habits are now internet-centric and most often occur in the context of a tiny illuminated screen. But after sitting around the Shelf Life table with other lovers of the printed word and discussing the future of digital books, the future of bookstores, curated readings, the role of editors, and our own personal reading habits — a familiar feeling washed over me: I wanted to read a book. I wanted to fall into and get so immersed into something that I didn’t know what time it was and I couldn’t wait to get back to it after I put it down. And I wanted get to started. Right. Now. (Thank you, Ghost Map! You were just the thing.)

Would you like to get excited about reading a book again? Have you also lost that loving feeling? (Ohhhhh that luuuuvvving feeeeeeling) Well, Gentle Readers UNITE! The discussion group convenes again this Sunday, August 21, at 3 pm. We have some selections from Alberto Manguel’s recent book, A Reader on Reading, as accompaniment, but by no means do you have to have read this before showing up. (Pick up the readings here or stop by Shelf Life for a copy.) Think of these short essays (in which Manguel muses about how he became a voracious reader, how that reader became a writer, and what the ideal reader is) as the aperitif (or the happy hour $3 well drink, you fancy people, you) to what we’ll actually be discussing, which I’m calling THE BEST PART.

THE BEST PART theme is inspired by Wave Books, our current publisher-in-residence, who has really kicked up the reading quotient around here. Every Sunday since July 31st they’ve been offering a combination bookmaking tutorial and a reading by a special guest. While visitors are sewing single-signature books, poets and translators (Joshua Beckman, Alejandro de Acosta, Hitomi Yoshio and Steven Karl) have been reading to them as they work, a cuban cigar factory tradition that I think needs to be replicated at all bookmaking facilities from here on to eternity. This Sunday is also Wave’s FINAL bookmaking tutorial and reading (starting at 1 pm), with the Special Guest Reader being none other than Christine Deavel, co-owner of the legendary Open Books, the ‘poetry emporium’ in Wallingford that carries over 9,000 titles of poetry or poetry-related books.

Here’s where you come in. Right after Wave’s reading we’ll continue in the spirit of readings-out-loud with Gentle Reader: THE BEST PART. We invite you to bring in your favorite books and to read to us what you think is THE BEST PART of the book, the passage that really sealed the deal for you, the page that you dog-eared, the part that you’ll always remember. It’s summer reading, potluck-style. This is the Gentle Reader in which we celebrate the act of reading and being read to. I hope that by the end of the meeting we’ll come away with a list of new books we’re itching to find — and that we’ve all got that loving (reading) feeling.

Sunday, August 21
1 pm
Bookmaking tutorial and reading with Wave Books and Christine Deavel

3 pm (note new time!)
Gentle Reader: THE BEST PART
Reading: Selections from Alberto Manguel’s A Reader on Reading
Readings by YOU — the best part of your favorite book

Shelf Life is the Henry’s summer ode to BOOKS and READING. From July 1 – October 16th, the Henry has invited book lovers from various fields — independent publishers, librarians, poets, writers, designers, and, most importantly, readers — to share with us what they do and why they love to do it. For a complete list of Shelf Life related programming, please visit this page.

Shelf Life: Bookmaking with Joshua Beckman and a reading by Hitomi Yoshio and Steven Karl

Since July 31, Wave Books has been hosting bookmaking tutorials and readings every Sunday in Shelf Life. These combination workshops/readings with different guest poets and translators are modeled after Cuban cigar factories, in which the workers are read to, out loud, while they work with their hands. The books that visitors are helping to make will be featured in Wave’s upcoming Annual Poetry Festival: Poetry in Translation being held November 4-6 at the Henry.

Today’s readers were special guests Hitomi Yoshio and Steven Karl, who read a beautiful short story by Mieko Kawakami recently translated by Yoshio. Hitomi Yoshio is a PhD candidate in modern Japanese literature at Columbia University and works as a translator and interpreter in New York and Tokyo. She was most recently involved in the launch of Monkey Business: New Voices from Japan (2011) and her translation of Mieko Kawakami’s work is forthcoming in the second issue of Monkey Business in 2012. Steven Karl is the author of the chapbooks emissions/of (H_NGM_N), (Ir)Rational Animals (Flying Guillotine Press) and State(s) of Flux (Peptic Robot Press). He has poems forthcoming in Forklift, OH, Pax Americana, and EOAGH. He is the news editor for Coldfront Magazine, poetry editor for Sink Review, and a co-curator of Stain of Poetry.

Ready to make a book while literature and poetry fills your ears? There will be one more workshop and reading next Sunday, August 21, featuring a reading by Christine Deavel, co-owner of Open Books in Wallingford. The tutorial on bookmaking will begin at 1 pm.

{Hover your mouse over the pictures for captions!}

Shelf Life is the Henry’s summer ode to BOOKS and READING. From July 1 – October 16th, the Henry has invited book lovers from various fields — independent publishers, librarians, poets, writers, designers, and, most importantly, readers — to share with us what they do and why they love to do it. For a complete list of Shelf Life related programming, please visit this page.