The Week Ahead @ Henry

Stop in this Thursday to experience music from performers from the UW School of Music. Enjoy these images of past events in this Luncheonette series every third Thursday at noon.

Music fills the Henry.  Photo by P. Dawn Keenen

Jazz with Haegue Yang
Photo by P. Dawn Keenen

Brass section in Katinka Bocke Photo by Chona Kassinger

Brass section in Katinka Bocke
Photo by Chona Kasinger

 

Our Spring Open House is next Friday — get your tickets now!

 

open house

The Week Ahead @ The Henry

Mid-Day Music Break

The Henry is launching a new monthly series this week: Luncheonette. Each first Thursday, we offer you a mid-day concert featuring chamber musicians from the UW School of Music.  From 12:30-1:10 this Thursday for our first concert. Check in at the front desk to find out in which gallery the musicians will be playing.

Luncheonette is free with museum admission (remember: UW staff, faculty, and students are always free!).

 

Faculty Lecture Series: Mark Zirpel

The School of Arts’ lecture series continues this week with a talk from 3D4M Assistant Professor Mark Zirpel. You can reserve your seat here. Tickets are free, but they go fast. Check out this video of his work created by the Museum of Glass in 2011.

 

Artist David Hartt Has Something to Say

 David Hartt

photo courtesy the artist

Come to his artist lecture next Thursday, September 19th at 7 pm and hear David Hartt speak on the commingling of the personal and the public, highlighting the narratives and ideologies that underlie manufactured identity and its lasting impact on society. You can reserve tickets here.

David Hartt: Stray Light, which opens on September 21, includes a group of color photographs and a video installation of the Johnson Publishing Company, which was founded in 1942 and made famous by its iconic magazines Jet and Ebony, as well as by its role as a leading arbiter of African American taste and culture during the latter half of the twentieth century.

David Hartt

David Hartt. Lounge. 2011. Archival pigment print mounted to Dibond. Courtesy of the artist and Corbett vs. Dempsey, Chicago.

For more images of Hartt’s work and to get a taste of what you will see at the Henry next week, check out the Corbett vs. Dempsey website.

And for a Friday afternoon boogie, may we suggest Ms. Janelle Monae?

What do you like to do in your Down Time?

 

If you want to learn how to do something, where do you go? To the internet!

Inspired by Do-It-Yourself culture and the wealth of how-to resources on the internet, our new Test Site  exploration, Down Time, is an eight-week presentation that explores free-choice learning and the pursuit of entertainment in our free time.

Most of us have gone to YouTube to watch a video on how to do [insert your favorite, tangential, and/or esoteric interest here]. Within a sea of exhibitionists, quacks, and celebrity seekers, we can also find real teachers and mentors who want to share their knowledge openly and at no cost.

And that is what we want to do for you this summer, gentle reader.

Each week,  Down Time will focus on a theme or activity in the form of video tutorials found on the web and will culminate with a  live tutorial or workshop hosted in the Test Site led by a guest local practitioner. These face-to-face learning opportunities offer an alternative to the online tutorials, allowing visitors to contrast and compare online learning with live tutorials.

The videos presented in this project were selected as a result of recommendations from specialists in each of the areas presented, suggestions from internet enthusiasts, and from Henry staff (ahem, official FYI: the video content presented in Down Time is not endorsed by Henry Art Gallery nor is it necessarily reflect the views of the institution).

Mark your calendars!

Week 1: Home Fermentation

Friday, July 5th at 4 p.m.

Kombucha demo with Chris Joyner of CommuniTea

Check out our Facebook invitation. The first 10 people to arrive on Friday, get a FREE starter kit — and if you ride your bike, you’ll get in to the museum for FREE because it’s Bike Friday!

Week 2: Extreme Makeovers  

Friday, July 12 at 5 p.m.

Make-up demos with Shannon Bisconer of Vain

Week 3: Life Hacks

Friday, August 19 at 6 p.m.

Light in a Jar Demo with Ned Konz of Jigsaw Renaissance

Week 4: Yoga

Tuesday, July  - Friday, July 27 at 12 p.m.

Yoga with Julia Greenway of Interstitial Theatre

Week 5: Throat Singing

Friday, August 2 at 4 p.m.

Throat Singing Workshop with Arrington de Dionyso

Week 6: Music Video Dance Tutorials

Friday, August 9 at 6 p.m.

Workshop with Kate Wallich

 

Pablo Helguera

pablo

 

Pablo Helguera is a New York-based artist who works with a wide variety of mediums including performance, sculpture, and photography that often engages social issues and also is the director of adult and academic programs at MoMA. Helguera is an exhibiting artist in the newly opened Now Here is also Nowhere: Part II which opened on Saturday. His classical cartoons are featured regularly on NPR’s Scherzo blog. He is also behind the newly launched series of artist-led participatory programs at MoMA called Artists Experiment.

This Friday musicians will perform Endingness here at the Henry Art Gallery in conjunction with Now Here is Also Nowhere: Part II.  Endingness is a composition for chamber orchestra designed to be performed together with the last movement of Franz Joseph Haydn’s Farewell symphony. This performance is but one component of Helguera’s three-part work, on view in the exhibition, and consists of three interrelated elements: a musical composition, a reconfigurable sculpture made of framed beeswax and an essay exploring themes of mortality, memory, art, and endings.

Friday, February 1st
7 pm
Get your tickets HERE.

Voicing Cage

This Friday in the Henry Auditorium, Stacey Mastrian and Stephen F. Lilly will present selections from John Cage’s vast and tremendously diverse output that employ the voice in its many facets. This is the final event in our public programming series commemorating the 100th birthday of the iconic American composer-musician-artist-philosopher-poet John Cage.

Soprano Stacey Mastrian is a Fulbright Grantee, Beebe Fellow, and Richard F. Gold Career Grant recipient whose performances have been broadcast internationally. Her repertoire ranges from late Renaissance to contemporary, and she specializes in 20th-century Italian vocal music, as well as the works of John Cage and Morton Feldman.

Stephen Lilly is a composer, new music performer, bass player, audio engineer, educator, and published theorist. Much like Cage, Lilly highlights aspects of musical performance that are often ignored or taken for granted. He is a full time faculty member at the Art Institute of Washington and has taught courses in recording, mixing, mastering, post production, and broadcasting.

Friday, November 30, 2012
7:00 – 9:00 PM
Henry Auditorium
$5 Students, Henry Members, and UW Staff & Faculty 
$10 General Audience
Get your tickets HERE.

 

The Rest is Just Noise: John Cage Programming at the Henry

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As many of you know, this year is the 100th anniversary of John Cage’s birth. Many arts and cultural institutions across the country are celebrating with John Cage programming, and the Henry is partaking in our own unique way. Within the past week we have staged a performance of Cage’s 33 1/3 Performed by the Audience on Friday. Read more about the performance HERE.

Earlier today we held a sold out workshop on mushroom cultivation at home, Fungus Among Us. You might be wondering “how this is a John Cage related program?” John Cage was an amateur mycologist during his 80 years. Don’t let the adjective “amateur” fool you though, Cage founded the New York Mycological Society with a small group of other mycologially-inclined people over 40 years ago. He also amassed a mycology collection during his lifetime which includes “correspondence, journals, newsletters, pamphlets, ephemera and realia related to mushrooms.” Cage gifted this collection to Special Collections at the University of Santa Cruz, where it can be researched and perused at the McHenry Library. Honoring the music John Cage composed during his lifetime is obviously necessary in a celebration of his life, but so is mycology. You can thank our Public Programs Coordinator, Whitney Ford-Terry, for such inspired programming honoring John Cage as the multidimensional man that he was.

Fungus Among Us was a workshop held at the Henry which was an introduction in cultivating your own edible mushrooms at home. We provided shiitake Grow-At-Home kits from Sno-Valley Mushrooms for the participants and helped them with their first step, rehousing the logs. Then Pacita Roberts with Hildegard Hendrickson from the Puget Sound Mycological Society gave a fantastic presentation on foraging for mushrooms. See pictures above.

If you are sad that you missed out on these two events, you have another chance to celebrate Cage’s multifaceted legacy in a unique way at the end of this month. On November 30th, the Henry is celebrating Cage’s vast and tremendously diverse output by hosting a performance by Stacey Mastrian and Stephen F. Lilly who will present selections that employ the voice in its many facets. These range from the simple, ethereal “Experiences No. 2” for solo voice with text by e e cummings, to readings from Cage’s prolific body of written work, such as Lecture on Nothing and Indeterminacy. Add the Henry to your calendar for November 30th, 7-9 pm, and buy your tickets here.

 

JOHN CAGE’S 33 1/3 at the Henry

Today, in celebration of what would have been John Cage’s 100th birthday year, we are staging his score, 33 1/3. participatory score, which features a room full of interactive turntables and vinyl records, was conceived of by John Cage during a residency at the University of California at Davis in 1969. For this work museum visitors are encouraged to take on the role of DJ and create a musical composition by freely playing records to perform the work.

We have records generously on loan from UW Libraries Special Collections and records that were part of the B-Side. The performance will continue on throughout the day until right before the museum closes at 9 this evening.

Check out some pictures of what you are missing by not being here now!

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Open House TOMORROW

The Henry Open House is teeming with fun, excitement, and art! Not only are we opening two new exhibitions, Like a Valentine: The Art of Jeffry Mitchell and Now Here is also Nowhere: Part I, but we are also throwing a museum-wide party! Come dressed in your conceptual best for the Student Henry Advisory Group’s Conceptual Costume Contest. Enjoy the sweet music of the UW Mariachi Band, Fainting Goats, and FBDC ~ ФБДЦ; Check out the FAN CLUB in the Study Center; eat some delicious babycakes courtesy of Cupcake Royale and enjoy libations from Pyramid Breweries. All of that PLUS installations of Public Health Poems by Rachel Kessler!

Rachel Kessler will premier her new poem cycle on public health posters installed in The Henry’s restrooms by sinks and in bathroom stalls.  Kessler will lead groups in hand-washing poetry usage, demonstrate hand washing technique, recite bathroom stall limericks, and sing sea shantys.  Each poem lasts approximately 30 seconds, the amount of time the department of health recommends lathering hands for.

 

PUBLIC HEALTH POEMS
About the project:

Remember how your preschool teacher instructed you to rub your soapy hands together for the entirety of the Happy Birthday song?  Now there is a poem for that.  While scrubbing in like surgeons, our minds and mouths deserve something more than that same old dreary song.

Rachel Kessler, a poet of the everyday, has composed a new poem cycle that will appear on bathroom stall doors, above urinals, and next to sinks in public restrooms. Posing as Employees Must Wash Hands Before Returning to Work signs and stall door advertisements, these poster poems will provide entertainment while imparting a useful earworm of knowledge.

She began writing her first anonymous protest poems on the bathroom stall walls in seventh grade, and has long been fascinated by graffiti art. Inspired by a collaboration several years ago with poet Pete Miller and their collective LOCCAL: League of Citizens Concerned About Literature, her work with homeless adults, and as a preschool teacher and parent, began trying her hand at School House Rock style poems for her kids to recite while scrubbing their hands at the sink.

Determined to put poetry in unlikely and non-traditional venues, her work explores the function and origin of poetry, not only as a mnemonic device, but as a way to reflect on the mundane, daily activities that comprise the majority of our hours. After a short residency in Rome researching ancient public health works, she collaborated with graffiti, nursery rhyme, fairy tales, health department propaganda to compose poems for hand-washing, poems for toilet use, poems for dental hygiene, poems for bathroom stall decisions.  Like the “Talking Fountains” of Rome, defaced statues where poets post anonymous political commentary, bathroom stalls are the original online comments.  Public restrooms, like phone booths, are one of the few public-private spaces where a citizen can find respite in a public place.

This project was funded by a City Artists award from the City of Seattle’s Office of Arts & Cultural Affairs.

 

About the Henry event:
Several Public Health Poems will be installed in the Henry restrooms by sinks and in bathroom stalls. Rachel Kessler will lead individuals and groups in handwashing-poetry usage in the restrooms via demonstrations, in impromptu bathroom stall limerick recitations, and in other public health poetic concerns.  Sea shantys will be sung in bathroom stalls.

 

BIO:

Rachel Kessler, co-founder of poetry-performance collaborations Typing Explosion and the Vis-à-Vis Society, is a writer and performer from Seattle.  Passionate about presenting poetry in non-traditional venues, she has performed interactive poetry in parks, on buses, in phonebooths, hair salons, and abandoned motels. She is visiting faculty and writer-in-residence at Centrum, a Whiteley Center Fellow with the University of Washington, a Jack Straw Writer, and senior writer-in-residence with Seattle Arts & Lectures.  She has performed at multiple times at the Seattle Art Museum, Bumbershoot, Night School at the Sorrento, Galapagos Art Space and Bowery Poetry Club in New York City.  Her poems have appeared in Tin House and the Monarch Review, and her text-based visual art is featured in The Open Daybook and Sea-Cat.

In summary, she’s a pretty rad lady. Make sure to spend some time in the loo at the Open House!

Wynne Greenwood at the Frye

Thursday October 25, 11 am – 7 pm & Friday, October 26, 11 am – 5 pm
Mirrors and Dresser Live Video Recording with Wynne Greenwood
Frye Art Museum
Free Admission and Parking

As part of the programming for the Frye’s new exhibition, Mw [Moment Magnitude]Henry Art Gallery performance artist and Stranger Genius Award Winner Wynne Greenwood will be live video-recording a music video project called Mirrors and Dresser. In this performance, Wynne will be re-creating The Women’s Spa, an installation she originally made in 2011 to explore security, transformation and isolation. The set is intended to encourage the public performance of a private process.

The Frye is also offering anyone who identifies themselves as a Friend of the Henry a 15 percent discount on coffee/espresso drinks during Wynne’s live video recording.

If you haven’t seen Mw [Moment Magnitude] yet or even if you have, these events are not to be missed!

Here is Wynne’s Artist Statement:

About Mirrors and Dresser

 When I think of women’s spas (my own experience with women’s spas being limited to the Olympus Spa in Tacoma, WA), I think of a place to rest, and to witness rest. A space has been created whose function is to allow communal relaxation. Now, that being said, the spa costs a minimum of $35 to enter, and is limited to women who were born with female bodies. From my experience, the majority of customers are white. I mention these details and observations because I’m interested in, and concerned with, who has access to transformative processes, and why.

 

For Mirrors and Dresser, popular cartoon characters and mythic figures, like Pebbles Flintstone, Betty Boop and Medusa, will hang out in the women’s spa on spa maintenance day, watching each other have a body, holding space for becoming space, and praying for an end to isolation through nostalgia.

 

Pebbles has been a happy baby for 50 years. Medusa has been the monster for hundreds. How tiring. These are characters we insist upon, myths that we replay again and again. Why? Is it comfortable? Why do we seek comfort? Can we let our icons and our myths change? Can we let even the role or function of “icon” and “myth” change? Did you know Medusa was a mother? She gave birth out of her neck to twins, Pegasus and a giant, as she was beheaded.

 

I’m choosing these characters to talk about cultural exhaustion. I’m also choosing them to help me perform. To act out and then challenge my own cartoony definitions, to allow performance itself to expand by first exaggerating its boundaries and then letting them relax, stretch out, soak and rest. Not necessarily seeking comfort, but transformation and a more complicated existence.

                                                            –Wynne Greenwood