Get Ready for a Digital September

We’re in the final month of The Digital Eye: Photographic Art in the Electronic Age, but we still have plenty of fun programs and events remaining.

Paul Berger. Seattle Subtext: Front and Back Cover. 1982. Gelatin silver print. Courtesy of the artist.

This Friday, September 2, is Gallery Talk: Paul Berger. Photographer and exhibiting artist Paul Berger will give an informal gallery talk on his work and the impact of photography and digital imaging on contemporary visual culture. Berger’s photographic work has always involved multiple images in structured sequences, sometimes with text. This interest in sequence and narrative transitioned in the early 1980’s to an interest in digital manipulation of electronic imagery, leading to the development of a series of digital imaging classes within the University of Washington’s photography programs in the mid-80s. Please RSVP here by the end of tomorrow (September 1st)! This program is FREE for Henry Members and Students and $5 for the general public.
And check out this recent The Stranger article “Everyday Life for Sentient Beings,” featuring Paul Berger. Beef up on your artist history, like his roots in Seattle and the beginning of his art technique, before you come listent to his talk on Friday. There’s also plenty of mention of The Digital Eye and its headlining artists and works.

Next Thursday, September 8, is our final Curator Led Tour for this exhibition. Join Henry Director Sylvia Wolf, curator of the The Digital Eye: Photographic Art in the Electronic Age and author of the recent book by the same name, for a unique look at digital innovations in photographic practice. We still have some spaces left! This event is FREE for Henry Members and Students and $5 for the general public. Purchase you tickets or reserve your space here!

Jason Salavon. Every Playboy Centerfold, The 1970s. 2002. Pigmented inkjet print. Collection of Timothy and Leslie Fichtner. Courtesy of the artist and Ronald Feldman Fine Arts, New York.

Explore the intersection of art, technology, and geography in this project workshop with Digital Eye exhibiting artist Jason Salavon. Participants will use their smartphones and digital cameras to gather photographs and location data, tracking their paths in time and space as they explore and document the area around the UW campus. Using geolocation technology, and a few other tools, participants will reconvene with Salavon to cross reference and assemble the visual and location data into visual representations of their activity. Click here to read more about Field Work with Jason Salavon, on Wednesday, September 14 at the Henry. This event is held in partnership with Photo Center NW. The fee is $55 for Henry and PCNW Members and $65 for the general public. Register at PCNW.org.

And we have even more Jasan Salavon for you! In conjunction with his workshop, the artist will give a lecture on September 15 at the Henry. Join Henry exhibiting artist Jason Salavon (The Digital Eye) for a talk about his work exploring topics ranging from population statistics and intelligent software to the evolution of soft-core pornography. Using software processes of his own design, Jason Salavon generates and reconfigures masses of communal material to present new perspectives on the familiar. Read more. This lecture is open to the public and is also part of a photography workshop, on September 14th. This program is FREE for Henry and PCNW Members and Students and $5 for the general public. Find out how to register at PCNW.org.

And your final opportunity to bid adieu to The Digital Eye is on September 25th when the show will be closing.

Salavon, Playboy Centerfolds, and Golems…Oh My!

Jason Salavon. Every Playboy Centerfold, The 1970s. 2002. Pigmented inkjet print. Collection of Timothy and Leslie Fichtner. Courtesy of the artist and Ronald Feldman Fine Arts, New York.

One of the Henry’s own currently-exhibting artists, Jason Salavon, and The Digital Eye: Photographic Art in the Electronic Age was featured in a recent Stranger SLOG posting! Click here to read the full article…

You can see Salavon’s Every Playboy Centerfold, The 1970s in The Digital Eye until the exhibition’s closing on September 25th.

“Jason Salavon scanned every Playboy Centerfold from January 1960 to December 1999, and outputted a mean image representing each decade in the form of a 5-foot-tall, ghostly photograph. Over time, the women got skinnier, blonder, and whiter.”

“Salavon makes all kinds of digital images. At the Henry Art Gallery now, in addition to one of these centerfolds, is one of the 100,000 convincingly expressive abstract paintings that Salavon printed out en masse. He calls them Golem. A golem, in Jewish folklore, is a living creature made of inanimate matter.”

And check out henryart.org soon for updates on the Jason Salavon Gallery Talk on September 15th at 7PM. He’ll also be at Photo Center NW the day before, September 14th, for a special workshop.

Seattle Times review of “The Digital Eye”

Julie Blackmon. Powerade (from the Domestic Vacations series). 2005. Pigmented inkjet print. Collection of Martin Werner Dreyer. Courtesy of the artist and G. Gibson Gallery, Seattle.

Read all about the Henry exhibition in this Seattle Times review that reminds you that an image is worth a thousand words, as the saying goes, but those thousand words might all be a lie.

Technology has driven the art and science of photography since the invention of the medium in the early 19th century. Digital photography is the most recent development, and in many ways the most perplexing and provocative. The Digital Eye: Photographic Art in the Electronic Age, drawn from public and private collections, presents the work of some of today’s most inventive artists who use digital photographic means.

Wendy McMurdo. Helen, Backstage, Merlin Theatre (The Glance). 1995. Pigmented inkjet print. Courtesy of the artist.

This excellent read by arts writer, Michael Upchurch, provides an overview of the meaning behind The Digital Eye, the tricks behind some of its most prestigious works, and insights from curator and Henry Director Sylvia Wolf (author of the book by the same title as the exhibition).

With digital photography, the line “between taking a photograph and making a photograph,” as Wolf puts it, continues to be blurred. Computer technology can make a self-evidently impossible image seem strangely plausible, as in Wendy McMurdo’s Helen, Backstage, Merlin Theatre (The Glance), where the title confirms that the “twin” girls we’re seeing are one and the same.

Julie Blackmon’s “Powerade” — from her “Domestic Vacations” series — has an undeniable feel of artifice. Yet it’s hard to pinpoint how the artifice is operating within the scene, which depicts the perfectly ordinary sight of a boy tossing a rubber ball into a garden. Everything about it is too crisp, too exact, as if the boy might be a cutout inserted digitally into a fantasy world of his own making. Blackmon keeps you guessing here as to how she pulled off the effect.

Todd Simeone. Gameboard. 2003. Pigmented inkjet print. Collection of Michael Van Horn and Patricia Wittmann. Courtesy of the artist and James Harris Gallery, Seattle.

Sean Higgins, Todd Simeone and John Haddock play with images deeply embedded in our memories, subtracting key elements from them while still ensuring that they’re identifiable. Simeone’s “Gameboard,” for instance, shows a Monopoly board that’s instantly recognizable as such, even with all its property names removed.

Check out this great preview of the show that “is both eye-baffling and mind-bending” before you come see it for yourself. Or, for those who have already experienced The Digital Eye, we suggest you still read this for some background info that might answer any remaining “how did they do that?” questions.

There are only two available tours left before the show’s closing on September 25, 2011 by exhibiting artist Paul Berger and curator Sylvia Wolf.

Gallery Talk: Paul Berger is a few weeks away on September 2nd, 7-8PM. In conjunction with the exhibition The Digital Eye, photographer and exhibiting artist Paul Berger will give an informal gallery talk on his work and the impact of photography and digital imaging on contemporary visual culture. This program is free for Henry members and students and $5 for the general public. Pre-registration is required.

Sylvia Wolf will conclude her series of curator-led tours of the show on September 8th, 7-8PM. Join our director for a unique look at digital innovations in photographic practice. Tickets will soon be available for this lecture. Check out our website for more details.

Paul Berger. Seattle Subtext: Front and Back Cover. 1982. Gelatin silver print. Courtesy of the artist.

Youth in Focus in Pioneer Square Art Walk!

Two YIF students in front of their shared gallery in Pioneer Square

If you can believe it, it’s officially August; which means another First Thursday Seattle Art Walk in Pioneer Square! You can come explore Victorian storefronts that have been converted into art spaces on August 4th, from noon to 8PM.

And as a Henry recommendation, we suggest you don’t miss out on Youth in Focus’s current summer project with Storefronts Seattle in Pioneer Square. This youth outreach group will have its students share studio space with photographer and intaglio print artist Daniel Carrillo while they create their 20 Paces Project.

Youth in Focus will be using their residency at 604 Second Avenue in the Hartford Building in Pioneer Square to shoot their 20 Paces Project, where the kids are tasked with photographing anything they can see from within 20 paces of the storefront door. Click here to read more about this YIF project in this great Storefronts Seattle write-up.

Youth in Focus is an amazing afterschool program that uses intensive photography training as a tool to help disadvantaged teens develop personal voice, positive identity, social skills and artistic skills. They offer free, multi-level classes in both film and digital photography, and advanced students participate in our job skills project shooting assignments for hire.

You’ll find this storefront, 604 2nd Avenue, right off of 2nd & James, next door to Trabant Coffee.
Come take a photo, be in a photo, fall in love with a photo.

Howard House

Time to RSVP for this Thursday’s tour of The Digital Eye!

Update: THIS TOUR IS FULL as of  Wednesday, July 27th!
Check our programs page for other exhibition-related events

Hurry up and reserve your spot for the curator-led tour of our exhibition The Digital Eye: Photographic Art in the Electronic Agehappening this Thursday, July 28th, at 7:00PM.

Technology has driven the art and science of photography since the invention of the medium in the early 19th century. Digital photography is the most recent development, and in many ways the most perplexing and provocative. Join Henry Director Sylvia Wolf, curator of the The Digital Eye and author of the recent book by the same name, for a unique look at digital innovations in photographic practice.

This event is free for students and Henry members and $5 for the general public (click here to become one of our awesome members). The tour will begin in the North gallery entrance to The Digital Eye.


“Exploring the limits of privacy at Henry’s ‘The Talent Show’” on KPLU

Stranger (6) 1999 by Shizuka Yokomizo

The Henry’s current exhbition, The Talent Show, was featured on Seattle’s radio station KPLU Sunday morning. In case you missed this great broadcast, you can hear it at the KPLU website accompanied by discussed videos and photos.

Radio reporter and host Jennifer Wing ponders the themes as well as specific works of The Talent Show including questions on the new idea of privacy and professional examinations of the societal draw to the spotlight. The exhibit raises a lot of questions ranging from how much should we put on display to what happens to our images once they are out there. The reporter’s final warning is if we don’t take control and manage our social media selves, someone else eventually will.

The review includes audio snippets of several Q&As among which include curator Sara Krajewski weighing in on the exhibition’s themes and specific works, and artist Amie Siegel, who discusses her process of creation for her displayed video works, My Way 1 and My Way 2.

The Talent Show examines a range of complicated relationships that have emerged between artists, audiences, and participants in light of the competing desires for notoriety and privacy that mark our present cultural moment. For almost half a century, artists have modeled and exploited these desires and dramatized the complex dynamics that surround them, often engaging people to participate in their work—both with and without their knowledge.

Some upcoming events for The Talent Show are The Emancipated Spectator: Broadcast yourself, part 1 (Video and TV) on July 21 at 7Pm and its partner event The Emancipated Spectator: Broadcast yourself, part 2 (Art, Enterntainment and Reality) on August 25, also at 7Pm. Join Henry Curator Sara Krajewski for this series of casual discussions on readings and films focused around the themes explored in The Talent Show. Check out the full details and RSVP at the Henry’s website.

The documentary We Live in Public reveals the effect the web is having on our society, as seen through the eyes of “the greatest Internet pioneer you’ve never heard of”, artist, futurist and visionary Josh Harris. This special film screening will feature an introduction from King of the Web CEO and online marketing pioneer, Maggie Boyer-Finch who will be discussing the launch and development of King of the Web, a site which is redefining what celebrity means in a digital world. You can join us for this event on August 5 at 7PM. Click here for admission prices and more info.

We Live in Public trailer

And last but not least, the Henry Art Gallery invites you to join artist James Coupe for a screening and discussion of the artist’s recent work with ‘surveillance cinema’ in (re)collector, Surveillance Suite, and the web-based work Today, too, I experienced something I hope to understand in a few days. Surveillance Cinema: James Coupe will be held on August 11 at 7Pm. Check out our event posting for admission prices and more info on the artist.

Sneak peak of Surveillance Suite

You have oodles of chances to see the widely talked about The Talent Show until its closing on August 21. And, in an excellent example of some of the exhibition’s themes, go ahead and like it on its Facebook page.

Virna Haffer at the Tacoma Art Museum

One of the highlights in our recent exhibition Shadows of a Fleeting World  introducing local audiences to the stellar photography of  Camera Club member Virna Haffer.
Now Seattle and Tacoma audiences have a chance to see MORE of her work.

Recently shown in the Henry exhibition "Shadows of a Fleeting World: Pictorial Photography and the Seattle Camera Club": Virna Haffer. His First Growth. 1924. Gelatin silver bromide print. Randall Family Collection.

The Tacoma Art Museum is presenting the work of photographer Virna Haffer in their exhibition A Turbulent Lens: The Photographic Art of Virna Haffer, showing now through October 16, 2011.One of the most inventive Northwest artists of her time, Virna Haffer was an internationally recognized and respected Tacoma photographer who has slipped from both regional and national art history books.

In a career spanning more than six decades, Haffer found success as a photographer, printmaker, painter, musician, sculptor, and published writer, though she is known first and foremost as a photographer. Self-taught, she began her ambitious career in the early 1920s, both running a successful portrait studio (where she photographed the likes of the Weyerhaeuser and Chihuly families) and also exhibiting her unique artistic images around the world.

Read more about this exhibition and its concurring events here.

Celebrate Photography during LONG SHOT 2011 in support of Photo Center NW

Support the Henry’s partner Photo Center NW in their 24-hour marathon fundraising event LONG SHOT June 17-18!

LONG SHOT is an event that celebrates photography, creativity, and our greater community, while raising funds for education and outreach programs at Photo Center NW. It’s a fun event for photographers to hit the streets and capture a theme, community, or subject of their choice. Just a few dollars per hour can help us bring new tools to the Photo Center, keep our doors open 7 days a week all year, and support public programs, outreach, and exhibitions

The event is open to everyone, using any camera, anywhere. At least one image from each participant will be featured in the LONG SHOT exhibition at Photo Center NW on July 23, 2011.

Milton Rogovin dies at age 101 in NY

AP Article via the Seattle Times:

Photographer Milton Rogovin dies at age 101 in NY – Seattle Times Newspaper.

From the New York Times’ Lens blog:

Milton Rogovin, an empathetic social documentarian who — like Jacob Riis — put a face on the faceless poor, died Tuesday, a month after celebrating his 101st birthday. Benjamin Genocchio has written the obituary for The New York Times. Mr. Rogovin himself narrated an audio slide show of his pictures, “The Compassionate Eye,” which appeared in April 2009 on Lens, accompanying “Voices Silenced, Faces Preserved,” with text by Randy Kennedy and pictures by Fred R. Conrad, in the Arts & Leisure section.

Museum visitors may recall that we celebrated Milton Rogovin’s 100th birthday last year, with this exhibition.
From the exhibition text:
Continue reading

Celebrate: the UW Press!

Marquand Books (which designs and produces fine illustrated books for art museums, galleries, trade publishers, artists, collectors, and architects) is honoring the University of Washington Press and its over 90 years of publishing and distributing thousands of titles by exhibiting some of its most beautiful and important books during tonight’s art walk from 5 – 8pm at their Paper Hammer location (1400 2nd Ave, Seattle). Copies of the Press’s staff selections will be available at the opening at Paper Hammer and throughout the month of January.

Speaking of the beautiful titles… the UWP has also recently produced Shadows of a Fleeting World: Pictorial Photography and the Seattle Camera Club with the University of Washington Libraries and the Henry to accompany the upcoming exhibit of the same name, which opens on February 12th. The book was written by David F. Martin, an independent art historian and curator specializing in women and minority artists of the Pacific Northwest, and Nicolette Bromberg, visual materials curator of the UW Libraries’ Special Collections. The book provides a rare look into the regional Pictorialist movement and the lives and artistic accomplishments of Seattle Camera Club, formed by Japanese immigrants in 1924, and it is filled with images and prints from SCC artists.

The opening celebration of the exhibition will feature a panel discussion by the two authors and Henry Chief Curator, Elizabth Brown. Also, in conjunction with the exhibition will be a series of photography workshops, and Cherry BLOSSOM, an all-ages celebration of the rich history and practice of the Seattle Camera Club. This afternoon of activities includes guided tours of the exhibition, art activities, readings in the Sky Space, and a hands-on photo adventure led by student volunteers from Youth in Focus.