The Week Ahead @ Henry

Ahead this week is sun, fun, stars, and a little bit of heartbreak. Join us as we wander the city and fall in love all over again.

Art Break Tour

Thursday, June 26, 12:30 – 1:00 pm

This month’s 30-minute tour, given by UW student guide Elissa Favero, will focus on the Henry’s architecture both the 1926 original structure and the renovation and expansion in 1997.

Speck on Speck on Speck

Friday, June 27,  9:00 – 10:00 pm

In conjunction with the Henry’s presentation of Summer Field Studies, artist Allyce Wood invites you to join her for a one-night meditation at Seattle’s Gasworks Park. Wood will lead participants in a reading and thought experiment to explore our scale against the twinkling lights of the city and stars beyond. Members of the Seattle Astronomical Society will also be present. FREE.

Image courtesy of the artist.

 

Workshop: Documentation in the Field

Saturday, June 28, 2:00 – 4:00 pm

Discovery Park – Get tickets.

Head out into the urban wilds of Discovery Park with Portland-based artists Daniela Molnar and Lisa Schonberg to discover variable forms of observation and documentation from drawing and notetaking to field recording and music composition. Materials for documentation will be provided. See you in the field!

Image by Tessa Hulls

Heartbreak Tour of Seattle

Sunday, June 29, 11:00 – 2:00 pm

Meet at the Henry, wander Seattle. Get tickets.

Join Made at Hugo House fellow Michelle Peñaloza for a walking tour of her chapbook-in-progress, landscape/heartbreak, a literary cartography of heartbreak in Seattle. Notebooks in hand, Peñaloza will guide participants to various locations throughout Seattle stopping at landmarks of heartbreak to engage with those spaces through poems and writing sessions.

Behind the Scenes @ Henry: MFA + MDes Students on Graduation

During the installation of  2014 University of Washington MFA + MDes Thesis Exhibition, we hounded the students for news of life-to-come once their studies were done. If you want to learn more about their art, get yourself a ticket for the Art Dawgs Reception and Tour tonight from 6:00-8:00  pm and party with the exhibiting artists.

Photo by P. Dawn Keenen

Andrew’s sculptures will get you thinking about space and placement.
Photo by P. Dawn Keenen

Andrew Hoeppner

Can be found on the internet or at Pike Place Market getting an espresso with cream & sugar. After graduation he is most excited about: “Freedom!”

Photo by P. Dawn Keenen

Bradley wants to change how you read on the internet – for the better.
 Photo by P. Dawn Keenen

Bradley Trinnaman

While students don’t have a lot of free time, Bradley likes getting over to Discovery Park. He also let me in on a secret: “I’ve never been to the gum wall. That makes me want to PUKE.” After graduation he says, “It’s time for a new start!” which he will ruminate upon with a nice iced sweet tea in the sun.

Photo by P. Dawn Keenen

Upon peering into this piece,  expect surprises.
Photo by P. Dawn Keenen

Hesheng Chen

Need a new perspective? Just peek into the objects on display for this MFA student. Hesheng spends his free time at the Ceramic and Metal Arts Building. When confronted with the idea of graduation he could only say: “Yahoo!”

Photo by P. Dawn Keenen

You don’t want to miss this cliffhanger.
Photo by P. Dawn Keenen

Kathryn D’Elia

After replying “Oh geez….” to the idea of graduating soon, Kat quickly moved on to topics she loved more, “I’m really into my couch, but I also love Discovery Park.” We then got to talking about the age-old debate between tea or coffee, “Sorry kids, not a fan of leaf juice. Coffee, two teaspoons of sugar, and just enough soymilk to cool it to a drinkable level.”

Photo by P. Dawn Keenen

Ever wondered what it was like to walk among the stars?
Photo by P. Dawn Keenen

Rebecca Chernow

Make sure to scan the QR code on the label in her piece for more information about the artist. After installing her artwork, she couldn’t wait to get back to “my backyard to have a coffee with cream.” Discussing graduation she says, “It’s been fun, but holy crap I’m glad it’s over!”

Photo by P. Dawn Keenen

Music and technology – where do you think it will go next?
Photo by P. Dawn Keenen

Sandy Pawson

Find Sandy here or picking up a new brew at Chuck’s Hop Shop in Ballard. Soon he will have more time to spend there: “Graduation — The point at which I’ll get my weekends back.”


Speaking of the weekend, the 2014 University of Washington MFA + MDes Thesis Exhibition is only open for another week! So head on over, enjoy a cool respite from the sun and see what our Huskies have made.

Exhibiting artists:

John Blalock
Hesheng Chen
Rebecca Chernow
Jonathan Cook
Kathryn D’Elia
Joe Freeman
David Gress
Jonathan Happ
Andrew Hoeppner
Abraham Murley
Haeree Park
Hannah Patterson
Sandy Pawson
Jason Petz
Bradley Trinnaman
Xinchen Xie

 

The Week Ahead @ Henry

 

Photo courtesy of Julia Greenway.

Video//Yoga

Thursday, June 19, 12:30 pm

Find the balance you need and interaction you crave with Julia Greenway every third Thursday.

 

Opening Night. Photo credit: Dan Bennett.

Opening Night. Photo credit: Dan Bennett.

Arts Dawgs Reception and Tour: 2014 MFA + MDes Thesis Exhibition

Thursday, June 19, 6:00-8:00 pm- CLOSES SUNDAY

Each year, the Henry presents the University of Washington’s School of Art Master of Fine Arts and Master of Design annual exhibition. This special Arts Dawgs event offers for a reception and tour of the exhibition. The artists will be present. The UW Alumni Association and ArtsUW have partnered once again to offer UWAA members exciting opportunities to experience the arts as an insider. Learn more about the program here. Tickets will be available at the door tonight.

 

Hylaeus Project, Fieldwork in Hawaii. Image Courtesy of Lisa Schonberg.

Summer Field Studies Takes to the Open Air

June 21 – September 14

Summer Field Studies is a presentation and interactive program series that invites visitors to explore contemporary art and ideas not only at the Henry, but out in the surrounding landscape.

Artists, musicians, permaculture advocates, curators, activists, sailors, poets and explorers were invited to participate in the creation of a series of interactive field guides for the Henry’s Test Site. These field guides will introduce visitors to a variety of individual and collaborative projects from in around the Pacific Northwest that deal with landscape as a means to facilitate personal reflection and as a discursive space. Projects range from outdoor residency programs, floating concerts, visits to secret gardens, and much more.

Featured artists: Meagan Atiyeh, Sara Edwards, Nat Evans, Jason Goods, Amy Harwood, Tessa Hulls, Garek Jon Druss, Joanne Lepreore, Molly Mac, Daniela Molnar, NKO, Michelle Peñaloza, Clyde Peterson, Ryan Pierce, Susan Robb, Kerri Rosenstein, Lisa Schonberg, Elizabeth Spavento, Allyce Wood

VIEWPOINTS: Sol LeWitt on view through Sept 7

LeWitt’s Squares are specifically reminiscent of faceted classification, a library development most commonly seen in e-commerce, allowing shoppers to search, browse, and filter merchandise by categories like color, size, and price. We experience such interactions every day, yet, like LeWitt’s art, we only see the surface presentation, never thinking about the work that goes into creating the rules and guidelines that make such interactions possible. — Rachel Ivy Clarke, PhD Candidate, Information School

This iteration of VIEWPOINTS features Red, Yellow, Blue and Gray Squares, Bordered By a Black Band (1989). These four aquatint prints by Sol LeWitt, are exactly as the title describes: a colored square surrounded by a black border. Prioritizing idea over craftsmanship, LeWitt saw the artist in a role similar to that of an architect; the person who designs a building but does not build it. He developed his artistic vocabulary from basic geometric structures and how they are transformed by using these fundamental elements as regular repeated modular units or in a series which explores a range of possibilities in a logical, preset sequence. LeWitt was fascinated by the multiplicity of things that can be generated by a simple idea.

From left, Rachel Clarke, PhD Candidate, Information School;  Huck Hodge, Assistant Professor, School of Music; and Jay F. Neitz, Professor, Department of Ophthalmology and Adjunct Professor, Department of Biological Structure.

From left, Rachel Clarke, Huck Hodge, and Jay F. Neitz.

A rotating series, VIEWPOINTS presents new combinations of artworks and voices, emphasizing how works from the Henry’s permanent collection can inspire and provoke new dialogues and thoughts. LeWitt’s four prints are displayed alongside the voices of three UW faculty members: Rachel Clarke, Pre-doctoral Lecturer, Information School;  Huck Hodge, Assistant Professor in Composition, School of Music; and Jay F. Neitz, Professor, Department of Ophthalmology. These three were specifically selected to respond to LeWitt’s artwork based on their research and teaching interests. We believe multiple voices can help expand our understanding of a work of art, cast a new light on overlooked details, and open our minds to new ideas.

VIEWPOINTS: Sol LeWitt will be on display on the mezzanine from June 6 through September 7.

Come and read each faculty response, and then create your own!

 

 

 

The Week Ahead @ Henry

Courtesy Ken Lambert from the Seattle Times.

Mindfulness Meditation

Thursday, June 12, 12:30pm

Moment by moment we live our lives; come learn how to be more mindful with us among the art.

 

Closing this Sunday!

This is the last week you’ll be able to see The Brink: Anne Fenton. We have been honored to show this emerging Northwest artist at the Henry. Not only is her work thoughtful and engaging, but it’s fun — much like the artist herself. Do yourself a favor and come check the show out this week!

 

Anne Fenton installation image

Installation view of “The Brink: Anne Fenton.” Photo credit: R.J. Sánchez.

Artist Anne Fenton with Brink Award funders Shari and John Behnke to her right. Photo credit: Dan Bennett.

Artist Anne Fenton with Brink Award funders Shari and John Behnke to her right. Photo credit: Dan Bennett.

A View into our Collection: Japanese Symbols and Motifs

From 1965-95, Susan Tehon lived in Japan and frequented the monthly flea markets at the Arai Yakushi shrine in Tokyo. She purchased used kimonos, which were readily available since the Japanese did not, at the time, like to wear old or used clothing. In 2012, she donated 38 boys’ kimonos and other Japanese costumes, textile, and photographs to the Henry.

The kimonos were used in the Miyamairi (Shinto shrine visit) and Shichi-go-san (seven-five-three) ceremonies, both celebrating traditional rites of passage. The Miyamairi was for one-month-old boys, and the Shichi-go-san for three- and five-year-old boys and three- and seven-year-old girls. New research by the Henry Collections staff has revealed some of the folk tales, symbolism, and other meanings associated with the imagery on the kimonos.

In the Miyamairi ceremony, a sashed kimono, like the boy’s kimono pictured below, is draped over an infant boy when he’s taken to the Shinto shrine. The sashes may also be tied around the neck of the person holding the infant. Relatives congratulate the baby by placing paper money between the sashes.

 

TC_2012.3-27

TC_2012.3-27_back

Japan. Boy’s kimono [front and back view]. 1926-1989. Plain weave; Resist dyed, paste resist (katazome); Painted (on fabric); Printed, stenciled. Silk. Henry Art Gallery, gift of Susan Tehon, 2012.3-27.

Amulets (semamori), which are traditionally hand-stitched by mothers or grandmothers, appear where the sashes join the lapel and serve as a charm against evil.

 

Japan. Boy’s kimono [detail of amulet]. 1926-1989. Plain weave; Resist dyed, paste resist (katazome); Painted (on fabric); Printed, stenciled. Silk. Henry Art Gallery, gift of Susan Tehon, 2012.3-27.

Japan. Boy’s kimono [detail of amulet]. 1926-1989. Plain weave; Resist dyed, paste resist (katazome) embroidered; Painted (on fabric); Printed, stenciled. Silk. Henry Art Gallery, gift of Susan Tehon, 2012.3-27.

The drum, arrow, and Shinto paper pendant on this boy’s kimono are all symbols of the warrior class. The paper strips on the pendant evolved over time from being symbolic offerings to becoming deities themselves. Warriors would attach the strips or incorporate their design on their standards (identification banners) and clothing in a show of faith.

 

Japan. Boy’s kimono [back detail]. 1926-1989. Plain weave; Resist dyed, paste resist (katazome); Painted (on fabric); Printed, stenciled. Silk. Henry Art Gallery, gift of Susan Tehon, 2012.3-27.

Japan. Boy’s kimono [back detail]. 1926-1989. Plain weave; Resist dyed, paste resist (katazome); Painted (on fabric); Printed, stenciled. Silk. Henry Art Gallery, gift of Susan Tehon, 2012.3-27.

Many of the Miyamairi kimonos have family crests at the shoulders. This boy’s kimono bears the wisteria crest. It became popular at a time when Fujiwara (“Field of wisteria”) was in power in the latter half of the Heian period, and it is one of the most intricate design motifs in Japanese heraldry. These circular emblems identified an individual or family.

 

Japan. Boy’s kimono [detail of crest]. 1926-1989. Plain weave; Resist dyed, paste resist (katazome); Painted (on fabric); Printed, stenciled. Silk. Henry Art Gallery, gift of Susan Tehon, 2012.3-27.

Japan. Boy’s kimono [detail of crest]. 1926-1989. Plain weave; Resist dyed, paste resist (katazome); Painted (on fabric); Printed, stenciled. Silk. Henry Art Gallery, gift of Susan Tehon, 2012.3-27.

Crests appeared on many artifacts, including futon covers and wrapping cloths, and seen illustrated on costumes and textiles on woodblock prints.

Japan. Furoshiki (wrapping cloth). Plain weave; Resist dyed, paste resist (tsutsugaki). Cotton; Vegetable dye (indigo); Pigments; Tsutsugaki printing. Henry Art Gallery, Frances and Thomas Blakemore Collection, 96.2-181.

Japan. Furoshiki (wrapping cloth). Plain weave; Resist dyed, paste resist (tsutsugaki). Cotton; Vegetable dye (indigo); Pigments; Tsutsugaki printing. Henry Art Gallery, Frances and Thomas Blakemore Collection, 96.2-181.

 

The Kabuki actors depicted in this woodblock print performing the play Kanadehon chishingura can be identified by the crests on their respective kimonos.

 

Yoshitaki (Utagawa Yoshitaki). Ozeki. 1865. Color woodblock print on paper. Henry Art Gallery, bequest of Miss Edna Benson, 69.68

Yoshitaki (Utagawa Yoshitaki). Ozeki. 1865. Color woodblock print on paper. Henry Art Gallery,
bequest of Miss Edna Benson, 69.68

 

Explore more Japanese crests identified in the Henry’s collection!
The Henry’s Collection Search now features extended notes in the detailed view option. We have begun to use this feature to showcase our Japanese research and will provide more extended object information in the future.

Thanks to researchers Elisa Law, graduate student in Museum Studies, and Diana Ryesky, costume scholar and volunteer, for their contributions to this research and post.

 

 

The Week Ahead @ Henry

Hello, June. Is Summer here yet?

 

The 2014 Annual Meeting of the Henry Gallery Association

Thursday, June 5, 4:45 – 6:00 PM

The Annual Meeting is a time to share and celebrate what we have accomplished over the past year with our valued members, Board of Trustees, and the community. We will also present information about upcoming Henry programs, exhibitions, and initiatives. This meeting is free and open to the public.

 

Mirror Check by Joan Jonas

Joan Jonas. Mirror Piece I. 1969. Chromogenic color print. Collection of the artist. Photo: Paul Hester.

Mirror Check

Thursday, June 5, 6:00 pm

Sunday, June 8, 2:30 pm - LAST CHANCE

These are the last two performances in this series so don’t miss your chance to see this groundbreaking work! In Mirror Check, a performer uses a small, round hand-held mirror to inspect all visible parts of her exposed body. Mirror Check — one of Jonas’ earliest works — marks an important theoretical and artistic turning point in her practice, when mirrors cease to be a material utilized in her sculptures and become actual instruments in her live performances.