Things Happening in Seattle Right Now

The rumors are true—

We are currently closed for installation! We are so excited to be working with internationally renowned artist Ann Hamilton for her building-wide exhibition  the  common  S  E  N  S  E, opening October 11th.

Dick Marshall Furrier, Seattle. Woman’s coat [detail]. 1940 – 1942. Karakul fur; Wool; Silk brocade lining. Henry Art Gallery, Elizabeth Landsome Estate, 86.10-1. Photo credit: R.J. Sánchez.

Dick Marshall Furrier, Seattle. Woman’s coat [detail]. 1940 – 1942. Karakul fur; Wool; Silk brocade lining. Henry Art Gallery, Elizabeth Landsome Estate, 86.10-1. Photo credit: R.J. Sánchez.

 

Hamilton’s last exhibition at the Henry was in 1992, entitled accountings. Get ready for this highly anticipated, large-scale show; it will be a big one!


 

In the meantime,

here are a few things happening in Seattle right now/coming up that are worth checking out!

@ SAM

City Dwellers: Contemporary Art from India

August 30, 2014 – February 15, 2015

City Dwellers features works from a few of India’s leading artists, who are influenced by religious traditions, popular movie culture, and digital technology.

@ the Frye

Your Feast Has Ended: Maikoiyo Alley-Barnes, Nicholas Galanin, and Nep Sidhu

June 14, 2014 – September 14, 2014

If you have yet to see this show, be sure to! Maikoiyo Alley-Barnes was one of the recipient of this years Neddy Awards.

#SocialMedium

September 27, 2014 – January 4, 2015

Crowd-curated exhibition in which, by the use of social media, works from the Founding Collection were chosen by 4,000 people from around the globe. We can’t wait to see what’s been chosen!

@ Photo Center Northwest

Richard Renaldi, Touching Strangers

September 10, 2014 – October 29, 2014

Richard Renaldi takes portraits of random strangers in arranged poses that go beyond comfort levels.

@round Seattle

2014 Washington Cider Week

September 4, 2014 – September 14, 2014

Head on down to the third annual Washington Cider Week, and enjoy the art form that is cider.

Mad Campus

September 13, 2014 – October 25, 2014

Check out UW’s campus for public art installations. A free art walk of the work will be held on Sunday, September 28 from 11 – 3 PM.

Wynne Greenwood at the Frye

Thursday October 25, 11 am – 7 pm & Friday, October 26, 11 am – 5 pm
Mirrors and Dresser Live Video Recording with Wynne Greenwood
Frye Art Museum
Free Admission and Parking

As part of the programming for the Frye’s new exhibition, Mw [Moment Magnitude]Henry Art Gallery performance artist and Stranger Genius Award Winner Wynne Greenwood will be live video-recording a music video project called Mirrors and Dresser. In this performance, Wynne will be re-creating The Women’s Spa, an installation she originally made in 2011 to explore security, transformation and isolation. The set is intended to encourage the public performance of a private process.

The Frye is also offering anyone who identifies themselves as a Friend of the Henry a 15 percent discount on coffee/espresso drinks during Wynne’s live video recording.

If you haven’t seen Mw [Moment Magnitude] yet or even if you have, these events are not to be missed!

Here is Wynne’s Artist Statement:

About Mirrors and Dresser

 When I think of women’s spas (my own experience with women’s spas being limited to the Olympus Spa in Tacoma, WA), I think of a place to rest, and to witness rest. A space has been created whose function is to allow communal relaxation. Now, that being said, the spa costs a minimum of $35 to enter, and is limited to women who were born with female bodies. From my experience, the majority of customers are white. I mention these details and observations because I’m interested in, and concerned with, who has access to transformative processes, and why.

 

For Mirrors and Dresser, popular cartoon characters and mythic figures, like Pebbles Flintstone, Betty Boop and Medusa, will hang out in the women’s spa on spa maintenance day, watching each other have a body, holding space for becoming space, and praying for an end to isolation through nostalgia.

 

Pebbles has been a happy baby for 50 years. Medusa has been the monster for hundreds. How tiring. These are characters we insist upon, myths that we replay again and again. Why? Is it comfortable? Why do we seek comfort? Can we let our icons and our myths change? Can we let even the role or function of “icon” and “myth” change? Did you know Medusa was a mother? She gave birth out of her neck to twins, Pegasus and a giant, as she was beheaded.

 

I’m choosing these characters to talk about cultural exhaustion. I’m also choosing them to help me perform. To act out and then challenge my own cartoony definitions, to allow performance itself to expand by first exaggerating its boundaries and then letting them relax, stretch out, soak and rest. Not necessarily seeking comfort, but transformation and a more complicated existence.

                                                            –Wynne Greenwood

Henry + Frye

 

Last week, the Frye’s new exhibition , Mw [Moment Magnitude] opened. This exhibition explores process across a multitude of platforms from contemporary Seattle artists. One of the artists featured is Jeffry Mitchell, who’s Like a Valentine exhibition, opens next Friday at the Henry Open House.

This Sunday, the Frye is hosting an event, John Cage and Friends: An Afternoon of Music and Film, in celebration of Cage’s 100th birthday. The program begins with a performance by Jarrad Powell of 4’33” (1952), Cage’s most well-known and controversial work. Following the performance, film critic Robert Horton hosts a screening of films that introduce the wide-ranging work of Cage and his circle. The event starts at 2 pm and you can find more information, including ticket information, here.

The Henry will also celebrate his centennial on November 2nd with a performance of 33 ⅓. This participatory score, which features a room full of interactive turntables and vinyl records, was conceived of by John Cage during a residency at the University of California at Davis in 1969. For this work museum visitors are encouraged to take on the role of DJ and create a musical composition by freely playing records to perform the work. Speaking of, do you have a portable record player (with built in speakers) that we could use during the performance of John Cage’s 33 ⅓ on November 2nd? Let us know! We will hook you up!