Get Ready for a Digital September

We’re in the final month of The Digital Eye: Photographic Art in the Electronic Age, but we still have plenty of fun programs and events remaining.

Paul Berger. Seattle Subtext: Front and Back Cover. 1982. Gelatin silver print. Courtesy of the artist.

This Friday, September 2, is Gallery Talk: Paul Berger. Photographer and exhibiting artist Paul Berger will give an informal gallery talk on his work and the impact of photography and digital imaging on contemporary visual culture. Berger’s photographic work has always involved multiple images in structured sequences, sometimes with text. This interest in sequence and narrative transitioned in the early 1980’s to an interest in digital manipulation of electronic imagery, leading to the development of a series of digital imaging classes within the University of Washington’s photography programs in the mid-80s. Please RSVP here by the end of tomorrow (September 1st)! This program is FREE for Henry Members and Students and $5 for the general public.
And check out this recent The Stranger article “Everyday Life for Sentient Beings,” featuring Paul Berger. Beef up on your artist history, like his roots in Seattle and the beginning of his art technique, before you come listent to his talk on Friday. There’s also plenty of mention of The Digital Eye and its headlining artists and works.

Next Thursday, September 8, is our final Curator Led Tour for this exhibition. Join Henry Director Sylvia Wolf, curator of the The Digital Eye: Photographic Art in the Electronic Age and author of the recent book by the same name, for a unique look at digital innovations in photographic practice. We still have some spaces left! This event is FREE for Henry Members and Students and $5 for the general public. Purchase you tickets or reserve your space here!

Jason Salavon. Every Playboy Centerfold, The 1970s. 2002. Pigmented inkjet print. Collection of Timothy and Leslie Fichtner. Courtesy of the artist and Ronald Feldman Fine Arts, New York.

Explore the intersection of art, technology, and geography in this project workshop with Digital Eye exhibiting artist Jason Salavon. Participants will use their smartphones and digital cameras to gather photographs and location data, tracking their paths in time and space as they explore and document the area around the UW campus. Using geolocation technology, and a few other tools, participants will reconvene with Salavon to cross reference and assemble the visual and location data into visual representations of their activity. Click here to read more about Field Work with Jason Salavon, on Wednesday, September 14 at the Henry. This event is held in partnership with Photo Center NW. The fee is $55 for Henry and PCNW Members and $65 for the general public. Register at PCNW.org.

And we have even more Jasan Salavon for you! In conjunction with his workshop, the artist will give a lecture on September 15 at the Henry. Join Henry exhibiting artist Jason Salavon (The Digital Eye) for a talk about his work exploring topics ranging from population statistics and intelligent software to the evolution of soft-core pornography. Using software processes of his own design, Jason Salavon generates and reconfigures masses of communal material to present new perspectives on the familiar. Read more. This lecture is open to the public and is also part of a photography workshop, on September 14th. This program is FREE for Henry and PCNW Members and Students and $5 for the general public. Find out how to register at PCNW.org.

And your final opportunity to bid adieu to The Digital Eye is on September 25th when the show will be closing.

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